Wednesday, June 03, 2009

Quote of the Day: Satriani

Matt Lewis:

During the 90s, it was often written that Bill Clinton was almost as good at communicating as The Great Communicator. To be sure, Bill Clinton was a gifted orator, but other than, "I did not have sexual relations with that woman" and "the era of big government is over," it's hard to remember anything he said. In this regard, he's sort of like a great guitarist such as Yngwie Malmsteen or Joe Satriani. They are technically great players, but nobody has ever had one of their songs stuck in their head. Contrast that with George Harrison, who was not a great player, but could write a catchy riff. Well, Ronald Reagan had a million memorable and substantive lines -- not the least of which was, "Tear down this wall!"

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Isn't that like praising someone for writing a television jingle you can't forget while waving your hand at someone who wrote a symphony that you can't pick any section out from?

(Yes, I'm marking an extreme example)

~MJA

Samay said...

And Clinton did have some really great lines - "Building a bridge to tomorrow" and "Keep abortion safe, legal... and rare" were both memorable and well-done.

JoeCollins said...

I guess I hadn't realized Clinton came up with safe legal and rare. Anyhow, that language was apparently dropped from the 2008 Democratic platform.

http://www.feministing.com/archives/010310.html

Agreed that "SL&R" was primo campaign language.

Bridge to tomorrow, or bridge to the 21st century or whatever it was ... I guess if you liked Clinton that had resonance, but to the right it was sort of a joke.

Reagan's 1964 Goldwater endorsement speech is still revered and cited to this day. Not exactly the "Free Credit Report dot com" advertisement.

I guess I was drawn to the Quote of the Day because I thought it was a really odd juxtaposition.

Anonymous said...

Works for me. It just sounded like sound bites were being praised instead of communication. To be fair, Samay is praising the same sound bites from Clinton.

I also undervalued Reagan's work before he got into the White House and started to fog a little... Then again, I probably wouldn't have considered it anyway since I mistakenly thought we were only talking about their presidencies.

~MJA